How would you describe Partakrist to someone unfamiliar with your works?
 D & T >
Crude hateful anti-christian satanic Black metal. If you enjoy darkness and violence with somewhat folkish themes, we might have some common grounds regarding to audial preferences.

Are there some bands you could be compared with, or some who's influence could be heard in your music in some way? What were (or are) the groups that originally sparked the musical style of Partakrist, if there were any? A friend of mine was reminded of Tormentor's "The 7th Day of Doom"-demo from 1987 when he heard your second demo, and there truly is some similarity between your and their lead guitars and vocals.
 D & T >
Of course we have been influenced by certain bands like Darkthrone, Dissection, old Burzum, old Mayhem and many others. The external musical stimulus is unavoidable since we've been listening to that kind of music for the most of our lives. However, we hear our sound as our own; the original rough and violent sound of northern Finland, not by imitating anyone but merely a sound to represent ourselves. The most important inspiration from those bands mentioned is more of an attitude. Their hatred towards political correctness and conformity was the spark that ignited the black torch we are carrying.

While on topic; what influences (or even forces) you to make your music, and, more specifically, why does it manifest in the form of Black Metal?
 D & T >
Satan is our motor. The great adversary of the slave morals. A self-respecting thinking nordic man needs no religious, nor any other kind of fake moral guidance from any self-appointed authority. We aim to dive deep into the human psyche and tickle the most archaic instincts of the beast in man, the fairness and the just cruelty of mother nature. And why does it manifest in a form of Black metal? Maybe because it is the one true sound. The sound of selfconcious white men broken free from the shackles of submission.

Just to get this off the table; what does your name stand for?
 D & T >
Part-a-krist as in "tear Christ apart". We came up with that explanation afterwards just to screw around with people who kept asking about it. Originally the word came to us intuitively without any earthly bearings. Just a word that disturbs the ether nicely enough when uttered.

Partakrist has existed since 1998. Has your lineup stayed the same throughout the years, and have there been periods of inactivity? How have the years molded your expression, in your opinion?
 D & T >
There's been quite a lot of traffic in the line-up, but the primus motor was from the beginning I.V Tuomari and P.P Deviant. We found the ultimate crew in the early 00's with K.R Kylmä and G.F Fornicator. We've had a few relatively short perioids of inactivity due to practical reasons like military service and logistic problems, but those are merely slight hiccups. Naturally there's always evolution in the musical, as well as ideological expression as the individuals grow up.

Regarding the question above; when comparing your '05-demo "Gomorran Orgiat" ("The Orgies of Gomorrah") with your fourth and currently the newest demo "Et Facta Est Nox," or even with the third one, I noticed a transition from short-ish outbursts of chaos and aggression to more darker and devoted compositions and more thought-out execution. The components that make your music sound like Partakrist and nothing else are still there, which got me thinking if this transition was intentional or simply a by-product of you and your group getting older and more experienced with your instruments and style?
 D & T >
Gomorran orgiat was composed from from the old material Tuomari and Deviant had worked up during a long period of time, some of the tunes dating back to very beginning. On the nameless one and on Et Facta Est Nox there are two more active composers in the band, and of course that shows in the songs. Any transitions in the style are by no means premeditated, just a natural evolution of a group when thick headed individuals are welded tightly together. We, like almost all people, were much more prone to blind berzerk rage in our late teens/early 20's than now after 13 years. The hatred and the fires of Hell still remain though. They just get deeper and darker year by year.

Which comes first, the lyrics or the music? I've understood that all the band members live far away from each other, so how do you compose and rehearse new songs, and how do you find a consensus regarding your compositions, chosen soundscape, lyrics and visual side?
 D & T >
The lyrics and the music come hand in hand, and both are of equal importance. We are scattered in a 500 km radius nowadays, but the internet makes things relatively easy for us. We all work by ourselves and share the results over the net. When there's enough songs that seem ready, we gather up at the rehearsal place and polish them. Everyone has a veto over everything, and we use that quite often too.

To give some example of the above guestion, how was the birth process of your youngest brainchild "Et Facta Est Nox" like, and how did you come to choose the specific visual artist? What were you aiming for with the chosen cover image, or in other words, what are you trying to say through it? It combines birth and death in a powerful way, that's for sure.
 D & T >
It was a difficult one to get out. We had all kinds of misfortune in the process from disastrous hardware failures to calamitous abrasion within the personnel, but in the end all the hardship just made the end result stronger. By all the difficulties it became something that we all can proudly stand behind. The cover artist is Heikki Väyrynen, an old friend. He's a professional artist, and we knew the guy well enough to trust him with the art. The inspiration for the subject comes from the photographer called Joshua Hoffine and one of the photos in his "Childhood fears"-series. Everyone is free to conjure up their own connotations, but to us it strikes as a statement of omnipotence of death. Life is transitory, death is eternal.

Is the distance between the band members the reason for your slow-ish recording pace, and for overall keeping rather quiet about your existence? I think I've never heard anyone mentioning Partakrist when I've had or read discussion about Finnish Black Metal, and I've seen only a couple of reviews of your releases.
 D & T >
The distance certainly doesn't make things easier for us, so the aswer would be partly yes. We've never entertained any "rock star"-mentalities. We'd rather the music speak for itself and share it with those we see worthy. We couldn't care less whether the mindless flock likes or doesn't like the things we do. Boasting and making a big deal of our personalities is a really strange idea to us. Of course it's always nice to get complimented for your work though.

Your lyrics have many themes. "Gomorran Orgiat" seems to explore the past and even present atrocities of the christian church, such as Crusades, as well as paedophile priests and pagan deaths. Your newest demo displayed a transition from such clear attacks against the church to a more self-centered, satanic, and even philosophical lyrics. Was this change caused due to you wanting to be more precise about your views and beliefs, or was it a reaction to the music becoming darker and deeper - or vice versa? Around their "Rom 5:12"-album Marduk stated that they've killed Jesus way enough times in their lyrics, and thus decided to wander off to deeper waters. Was it the same for you; noticing the need to do something different?
 D & T >
Actually the lyrical themes haven't changed that much. We've never sang about pedos, and there are themes considering the slaughter of the christfolk on Et Facta Est Nox as well. Of course the expression has found some more mature and contemplated presentations, but the subjects remain the same more or less.

Your third demo features a song titled "Veri ja Kunnia" ("Blood and Honour") which got me curious on your views on national socialism and NSBM. What are your standpoints on these subjects?
 D & T >
We're certainly not NSBM, but we do recognize that particular subgenre as a part of the Black metal scene. Certain fascist ideals are imperative in the frame of reference within Black metal, but as a band we couldn't care less about societal issues, let alone german domestic policies 70 years ago. "Veri ja kunnia" is not a reference, it's meant to be taken literally. Goebbels shouting in the intro is just a prime example of the very core of human nature. Also a great provocation.

You released a compilation of your second and third demos through Wolfsvuur Records in 2008. Do you have any intentions of making your debut demo available as well? At least your second demo was a great listen, so I bet your listeners would be eager to hear your debut release as well. Is the debut demo "Kuolema" somehow, even radically different from your later releases?
 D & T >
Most material from Kuolema have gone "over the mountains" during the years, so no. It wasn't so different musicwise compared to Gomorran orgiat, just more sloppily played and with that typical 90's fourtrack sound. No-one's missing out even though it's lost.

Is Partakrist an antichristian or a pure satanist group? Some artists are really strict in standing for one of these but not the other, which is why I'm asking.
 D & T >
That's just a question of overly simplified concepts. Satanic band is by definition anti-christian and brought to a head, that's what Black metal is all about. To explain in plain, for example muslims are anti-christian, but not satanic in the sense of the word.

In your song "Revendicationis" you tell your listener to hear your command. It got me thinking, who is your music and message aimed at? Do you have a "target audience," or do you really care who hears your music? You told me earlier that Partakrist is a manifestation of your views on how to live and what is acceptable, and so forth. Are your lyrics devoted to your enemies or moreso to your "allies"?
 D & T >
The target audience is anyone who relates him/herself to our words. Those who have ears, hear it. The lyrics are devoted to ourselves as personal notes or elucidators to our own thoughts.

How would you summarize your core message or ideology?
 D & T >
Live hard, die hard, regret nothing. Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law. Blood for Satan.

Is there a reason for not including the lyrics to accompany your releases?
 D & T >
None whatsoever.

One more question about your lyrics. In your opinion, does non-satanic black metal exist? I've heard some people say that they don't even care about the lyrics in Black Metal, or music overall for that matter, which struck me as bizarre - although understandable, as it's clear that some people are just "in it for the buzz."
 D & T >
There always will be hangarounds and people who just got in the wrong train. That really doesn't bother us much as long as they keep their mouths shut. Black metal is more of an ideology than just a music style. If you don't understand the core idea of BM then you're not part of it. As simple as that. So no, it doesn't exist.

Wolfsvuur is the only label you've associated with this far. What's your opinion about the label, and are you still satisfied with the "Me Tahdomme Barabbaan"-compilation tape?
 D & T >
We've always been treated with nothing but fairness and respect by Wolfsvuur. One has to admire their dedication and hard work they put out. Not everything they release is a cult classic, but they're honest to their own likings disregarding the scene sandbox. We're very satisfied with the compilation. They were, after all, two old ready made demos with no distribution at all. No money was handled and no immaterial rights were exchanged.

As mentioned above, you certainly haven't been in a hurry to release new material during your time in existence. Do you even plan on recording new demos, or do they just manifest when the time is right without too much planning?
 D & T >
No hurry at all. Quality over quantity. We're constantly in a creative process with our respective selves, and when the time is right, music happens.

Are there some specific things that you'd want to achieve as a band, be it for example recording and releasing a full-lenght or playing a gig at a certain event, or do you just craft and record the songs for your own pleasure, craving, ideological manifestation or listening enjoyment?
 D & T >
Plans are all open, time will tell. Of course it's delightful to learn that there are people who enjoy our music, and we certainly don't have any policies against live perfomances. We do have a lot of musical ambitions, they're just mostly regarding to our persons.

More specifically, what are plans for now that you've released the first pressing of the demo? Do you plan on getting a more professionally duplicated pressing of it done by some label, and do you already have plans for a follow-up record?
 D & T >
We have loads of material to work with. There probably will be some physical evidence sometime during 2012. There also has been lots of demand to get a second pressing of Et Facta Est Nox as well as some more t-shirts. We're not actively looking for anyone to release the CD for us, but we wouldn't mind that either if the deal wouldn't be completely jewish.

Do any of the Partakrist-members have other musical outlets? If yes, would you like to share a few words about them?
 D & T >
Deviant plays double bass with the local fiddlers. Actually all of us have many other projects with a vast variety of styles. However, they're mostly completely separate to Partakrist, so no need to bring them up in this interview.

Do you follow the hugely overcrowded black metal-scene in any way? If yes, are there some bands you'd like to recommend to people, or specifically to your listeners? To me it's seemed that Partakrist hasn't been too zealous to operate as a part of any scene or social group.
 D & T >
Yes we do follow the scene. Best way to find a good new band is just to listen lots of them. Nowadays every john has their own recording equipment, so most of the stuff released is crap. Those who have ears for it and such desire, will siphon through the piss and find the suitable ones.

It's time for the regular guestions. What is your view on music piracy and digital releases?
 D & T >
Piracy as filesharing and showing material FoC is totally acceptable and it supports the idea of a great web library of music, books and videos. The modern entertainment industry is nothing worth of supporting, and the true fan will buy the product made by the true artist. Digital release is a convenient way of promotion, but what is it compared to a physical release with booklets? A 12 inch plate of plastic can be a magical fetish to own.

Briefly, your thoughts on the following: human, music, black metal, god, the devil?
 D & T >
Human: A carbon based life form whose main goals are to multiply and turn other carbon based lifeforms into excrement.
Music: A way to convey your feelings and mindset to others. Manipulation of the ether to force your will.
Black metal: The dark side made audible, a way of life.
God: Prime mover, the cause for the first effect. Not watching over you.
The Devil: Change, impudence, freedom and delight. Not watching over you either.

If you could instantly change a thing or two in the world, what would these things be?
 D & T >
Give ourselves a cubic fuckton of money and instigate a nuclear war somewhere far east.

This paragraph is for whatever you'd like to say that we haven't covered above. Do feel free to advertise.
 D & T >
A man without a moustache is like a wolf without a tail. Also, don't start a band, go burn a church instead. Or a mosque. (we need more terrorists, remember?)

We also have some pieces on YouTube from Et Facta Est Nox.
Alttari
Tuli, Kulje Vierelläin
Revendicationis

To get in touch drop a line to: deviant.partakrist(at)gmail.com

The time has come to thank you for taking your time to answer our guestions. May your flame keep on burning bright.
 D & T >
Thank you for your interest. Hail Satan!