So, first off, could you describe the sound and style of Tile to our readers who haven't yet heard of you?
   R >
Tile is a train-wreck mixed with feedback soaked with dirge. Noiserock from Pennsylvania with a sucker punch to the balls.

Tile was formed in 2006. What was it that urged you to form the band? Was it perhaps meant to be a way to channel out your frustration?
   R >
I was doing this skaterock band at the time called Carpenter Ant, but wanted to actually play an instrument. I wanted to play bass for a FLOOR style band mixed with Neanderthal and some sludge. I just felt the urge to do something out of my comfort zone with different people. I guess it could be channeling my frustration but I just wanted to play some heavy jams.

Has the band's meaning to you and its way of composing and generally operating changed in any major way since its foundation? You used to make some way longer songs in the band's early stages, but I'd "blame" this change simply on your improved skills.
   R >
Real funny you mention this because for our new album, I went back to square one and wanted to just bring back some older style TILE. We recorded some jams where it was the same 2 parts for over 15 mins. When you just get in the zone and want to play and feel out what you can do with the songs. Something like that. We obviously are going to improve but still keep the raw, simplistic style around. I don't want to get better on bass, so that will definitely keep us from really improving.

What are the bands that originally inspired you, and what bands inspire you today? You've mentioned Floor as one of your important influences, at least.
   R >
Early FLOOR, CHERUBS, SWANS, BRAINBOMBS for sure. Mike and I just go in cycles with bands we are into at the moment and then that could be the influence for a song. L7 and PISSED JEANS have been on rotation this summer.

Why the name Tile? Does it symbolize something?
   R >
When I was thinking of what we first wanted to call this project, I wanted a name that just stood out and was simple. Our friends in a noise band called Air Conditioning, gave good encouragement when we started because they helped me (us) with getting a band practice space, and just the motivation to just make songs. Jeff the Pigeon was where we really started figuring out what we were capable of and where we just let the song writing develop on its own. The name doesn't symbolize anything. It is just a word.

What are your lyrics inspired by, and what're they generally about - do they have a message or deeper meaning of any sort? They're filled with anguish, frustration and violent contemplation, so I'm assuming that just the people around you are a major influence.
   R >
Mike and I both have different ways of writing lyrics which I think is good because it isn't always the same way. Some bands are like eating the same shit everyday. Very similar vocal patterns with the same screams. I like that we both change it up. As far as messages, it all depends on the song. They are all over the board in meanings. People and family members are my inspiration covered in disgust of humanity. I like making people feel uncomfortable.

What is the effect you want to cause on your listener, either when playing live or through the records - or what kind of emotions and feelings do you want to fill the listeners' heads with? Do you have some intent here, or do you even care? Based on the lyrics' and the song titles' occasional pitch-black humour and for example the locked groove of really loud distortion in the end of your "Welcome to Ditchyourfriendsville"-MLP, I'd guess you like to piss off your listeners at least a little bit.
   R >
If you feel uncomfortable or all warm inside, we are just 3 dudes playing music. Everyone has their ups and downs in life. This is just our way of expression.
   The locked groove was my idea on Welcome to Ditchyourfriendsville and the intent was to piss you off for sure. I like noise music and after having that influence of going to shows at Jeff the Pigeon, I wanted to add a little seasoning to the LP at the end. One guy reviewed that LP once and said it made a mice run out from a cabinet so we make pest control music as well.

Most of your releases have been very limited editions, between 50 and 200 copies. Was this limited availability intentional, or are the pressings merely the result of little demand? How do you promote the band and its gigs, if at all?
   R >
we release small amounts because the demand is not always there. We put out what we can afford at times, which looks like we do it on purpose. We are not selling 500 copies of records at times, so it is what it is. Promotion of the band is done for shows and the band itself, through flyers and websites. We don't have a booking agent to get us more shows, which we should find some way to get someone to do that. We'd probably get more shows if we had help but we do what we can.

Some of your releases have also had some special versions available. For example, the "Welcome to Ditchyourfriendsville"-MLP was available in two colours, with a part of the green-coloured pressing coming with a CD-R with one bonus track, and mere 40 copies coming with hand-made lyric inserts. What is it in limited pressing that fancies you so? Is it to make something special available for diehard fans, to piss off people who are left without them, or what?
   R >
a way to make the record more interesting to have. I have been buying records for quite some time and when i see a band go a little further in making it more personal, I want to own it more. that is really it.

Aside of your first demo-tapes, you've released material solely on vinyl. Is there a special reason behind this choice?
   R >
CDs are a dying items. We enjoy cassettes and vinyl.

All of your releases this far have been of the shorter kind, from eight to twenty minutes long. Has there been a specific reason for making a bundle of smaller releases instead of a few longer ones?
   R >
I think if we get asked to release something, we just do it. Last year we were asked to do two 7"s and we had been thinking we want to start on a album, but it got pushed back for these other releases. Stuff also was delayed 2 years ago because I was filming a video part for my skateboard company and i had to scrap 3 years of footage and start from scratch. That put Tile on hold for a little bit, while I was really focused in putting out a good video part. My hands were wrecked and I didn't put in as much effort in writing the songs. Playing bass with wounds on your hands sucks. Since then, I learned to manage my time better and learned to make use of my skating and non skating time. I love doing both so i just had to figure it out.

Currently, however, you are indeed working on your debut full-length album. What can you reveal us regarding it? How is it different or similar musically from your earlier works? Who will release it, in which format(s), and when will it be available?
   R >
The album will be down in the next month. it is called "You had a friend in Pennsylvania," released on LIMITED APPEAL RECORDS.
   I think it is right up there with our stuff, full of dirge, downer jams and dropkicks to your throat to fast shit. Just a vinyl release, with a download code of some sorts possibly. It is 9 jams in usual Tile format. We are hoping for a fall release with a few weekend trips to promote the record. We love to play overseas as most of our fans are ordering records from Finland and EUROPE. An USA tour as well. Whatever works and comes together is cool with us.

As your music is of the loud and noisy type, I've wondered if you've ever thought about publishing a live- or a rehearsal-recording?
   R >
We were supposed to have a live performance out on vinyl as well when we played on wxlv 90.3fm but there was a problem getting a rough draft, un-mixed from the engineer. So, we slack and gave up bothering him, and there we have it: no live record.

Regarding the above, how are your live-performances generally received by the audience?
   R >
Well, I think. Kids get loose and violent. We usually play with punk bands or hardcore bands so noiserock is a good fix for those duders.

All of your releases have a strong and simple visual side with some violence, anger or death in them. How do you create the visual side for your releases?
   R >
The only answer is: it just happens. There is no heavy thinking. If we find a photo funny or harsh, we will just use it. I think you can take any feeling you get for one photo, and have that same photo later pull something else out of it. Give it grief or happiness. It just happens.

Of all the bands, your sole split record has been with Sloth. How did this split come to be, and are you a fan of Sloth's works? Do you have any other splits planned, in the process, or in your dreams?
   R >
I like SLOTH alot, and wanted to do a release with them when we first started. That is how that release happened. I have so many of SLOTH records. And if someone asked us to do a split, we'd probably do it. We just don't have offers banging down our doors every day, week, month, and year.

You also took part on the Burning Hell Records' second 4x7"-compilation. Would you like to tell us something about this one as well, and how did you come to take part on the compilation? As it's limited to mere 100 copies as well, will there be a separate release of your two-song 7" included in the box set?
   R >
Burning Hell got ahold of us through Limited Appeal. We were into it from the get go but more stoked when we heard NO BALLS (members of BRAINBOMBS) was doing it. Crazy how the power of the internet can really get your band out there. I think communication with the label or any label, should be simple and direct, and that was how they did it. We are stoked to be apart of that box set.
   R > I don't know about the separate release of the 7" from the Burning Hell Records box set. The only answer I say is: maybe. Or if someone asked us, they might be able to do it.

Is Tile the only musical project of its members? If not, would you like to share a word about the other ones as well?
   R >
I sing in a punk / hardcore band called Bad American as well. I balance those two between my busy schedules. Tim was playing surf style music with Brad / Pissed Jeans for awhile and Mike has been doing solo stuff when he has a chance. We don't talk to each other much outside of practice much. That may be good, or maybe bad.

Have you lately ran into any new bands that you'd recommend people to check out - either for the fans of your music and noise rock, or just people in general?
   R >
Shit, Muscle Revolution is on a tear in our hometown. Stripped down punk mixed with FLIPPER and antics, BASTARD THIEVES are some NEUROSIS space jams, PISSED JEANS new album will be worth the wait as they never disappoint and they are good friends of ours, ORPHAN DONOR, PROSTHETIC HEAD, and so many more.

Anything else you'd like to add or discuss further?
   R >
Did you watch the OLYMPICS? I didn't. Who won?

I thank you for your time!
   R >
Thanks for your time as well. We really appreciate it.