This is the first question I tend to ask all the bands I interview, and I won't be making an exception now: how would you, as the band's musicians and artistic guides, describe your music and expression? Are there some bands that you'd be comfortable comparing your own expression with?
   Kuilu >
We rely heavily on the atmosphere, trying not to forget the emphasis on the riffs. We have been told a few times that our music resembles German bands like Kältetod, Luror and Kargvint, and that may be the case.

Kuilu was founded in 2010. What was it that made you found the band; what were your initial goals and aims with the band, and have they changed since then? How was the line-up formed?
   Kuilu >
In the beginning there was a constant desire to create music like this. Before the final line-up was formed, the compositions for the EP were already done. A line-up was formed in order to record the compositions, but during the recording process, the line-up solidified.

Why the name Kuilu (which stands for a pit, or a chasm)?
   Kuilu >
It is a symbol for a constant state hard or impossible to escape. The symbol has different meanings in different contexts (releases).

Did you initially have some specific bands in mind when you were looking for your own style and expression, and your music's goal atmosphere? As a follow-up, what is it that influences your music; other bands, emotions and real life, fiction, paintings, nature..?
   Kuilu >
Any specific bands were not so much of influence, rather some traits of bands and styles. The grace from black metal, the melancholy of post-punk, the apathy from doom metal and so on. The felt emotions are the driving force.

You released your debut EP (reviewed here) last year. To my knowledge, the EP was self-financed and -distributed. Was this the original plan, or did you face problems to find a suitable label to release and promote your works?
   Kuilu >
We were in contact with a few labels, but after some difficulties, it seemed to be the best option to release it by ourselves.

Was the record self-recorded as well?
   Kuilu >
It was recorded with help from a friend who could handle the mixing table and borrow some equipment.

What kind of a reception has the EP been met with this far? How about you as the artists themselves, are you still fully satisfied with the release?
   Kuilu >
The EP hasn't spread very wide, but many of those few who have bought the EP have liked it. As for us, we are satisfied. As often, you can find a few little things that could have been done otherwise, but we are very satisfied overall.

Your lyrics are rather poetic and bleak, and even depressed in some sense. How important are the lyrics in your music, in your own opinion? What is their function, and what/who are they influenced by, in case you can name such entities? Does Kuilu have an ideologic foundation?
   Kuilu >
The lyrics are an important part of Kuilu, and the whole band indeed is built upon the themes. They are born from a personal aspect, but they are still quite universal. For the EP, the main inspiration was death in real life. Triggered by certain moments, feelings and places, the lyrics simply come to be in instants without much effort. Some pieces of literature have worked as triggers, for example Albert Camus's The Stranger. Kuilu doesn't proclaim anything – the work is rather born of apathy.

What kind of qualities were you looking for when you were crafting the EP's general sound; did you give more focus on the compositional flow, or was it more about the general atmosphere and lyrical themes that set the pace and mood of work?
   Kuilu >
The focus was definitely on the latter. The compositions were carefully thought through.

Your logo was crafted by Christophe Szpajdel. Was he the number one option when you were thinking of people to ask to create you a logo? How was this process (regarding your communication), and what was his opinion on your band?
   Kuilu >
Actually, we never thought of anyone else creating the logo. We admire his work and style. Mr. Szpajdel is a pleasant person and the co-operation was blooming. The amount of praise was quite surprising, actually.

Your debut EP has a very bleak and minimalistic design, and it's all hand-drawn. Who made the covers, and what kind of an effect were you aiming to create?
   Kuilu >
The graphics were made by the band and two friends. We wanted to bring the themes of the lyrics to every detail of the graphics. The simple style goes hand in hand with the sound, we think. The graphics are organic.

Along with other things, your booklet features a drawn Ouroboros. A simple question: why? To remind your listeners of (the inevitability of) death?
   Kuilu >
Ouroborus is here used as a symbol for continuity. The EP is not about only death in itself, but the beautiful cycle of creation-downfall-creation, which can easily be seen on the lyrics. Indeed, the music itself on this record creates a cycle.

You've performed with bands from various genres, from doom metal and black metal to post-punk and industrial. How has Kuilu fitted amongst bands from so strongly different fields of expression, and has this kind of variation been to your liking or more so a necessary evil?
   Kuilu >
Black metal is musically maybe the most compatible style to share the venue with. The variation makes the concerts more alive. The melancholy and deepness is the common factor – it is an honor and a pleasure to perform with bands whose music we enjoy.

Do you employ some visual aids when performing live, be it some specific clothing or such?
   Kuilu >
We have used memorial candles concerning the themes of the EP. Also, there shouldn't be too much light for us at the stage. So, just small things.

Has it been challenging to transfer the recorded works into a live-setting? Your songs seem to feature quite a few transitions from acoustic to electric parts as well as from calm moods to more abrasive moments, so I'd suppose that keeping it all together is something of a delicate process.
   Kuilu >
The songs seem to become even more alive when performed live since the contrast between different parts increases, and that intensifies the emotional swell. We haven't altered the music much for live settings – in fact the EP was recorded live (at our rehearsal place) in one take in order to make the recording sound like a band, not individuals.

I know you're a young band, but perhaps this is more relevant when thinking of the band's first moments; are you more of a live- or a studio-band, or are both equally important? What purpose do the live performances serve to you, and what kind of an impression and effect do you aim to have on the audience?
   Kuilu >
Both are important. The live performances give strong, unexplainable feelings. There's not much interaction with the audience, since we want ourselves and the audience to concentrate on the music and the atmosphere.

What are the future plans of Kuilu? Do you already have a new release in works, perhaps?
   Kuilu >
We are slowly crafting a demo cassette, and we also have scheduled some live performances for this year. The demo will propably contain two new songs.

I understand that this question might be a bit awkward since we're focusing on Kuilu here, but is Kuilu currently the only or the main project for you? What kind of musical ventures have you had prior to Kuilu, and do any of you work within other fields of expression than music?
   Kuilu >
Kuilu is the main project for all of us, although we have some other projects that are unrelated to it.

Anything else you'd like to discuss, ask, advertise or otherwise bring up in the end of this interview? The word is yours.
   Kuilu >
We would like to thank you for your interest in our work and giving us an opportunity to express our thoughts about what we do.

Thank you for your time.