What was the first band that you joined, Lizzie?
   Lizzie Grey >
First real Hollywood band: Tear Garden. An early '70s Doors-like metal band.

Could you tell us about your early days in the band London? When did you meet Nikki Sixx?
   Lizzie Grey >
I formed London with Nikki Sixx after Blackie Lawless fired him from yet another configuration of Sister. Nikki and I hit it off right away when Blackie first brought him in from a Recycler ad. Needless to say, I was disappointed when Blackie let him go. After that it was onwards and upwards for Nikki and I, as the New York Dolls-influenced London became the talk of the town in Hollywood.

Could you tell us about writing the songs "Nobody Loves You Like I do," "Straight from the Heart" and "Oh, what a Dream Girl"?
   Lizzie Grey >
"Nobody Loves You Like I Do" was a collaboration by keyboardist John St. John, Nigel Benjamin and myself. "Straight from the Heart" was written by former London vocalist Henri Valentine (replaced by Nigel Benjamin). "Dream Girl" is 100% Lizzie Grey.

You wrote "Public Enemy #1" for Motley Crue's first album. Could you tell us about the writing and recording of that classic track?
   Lizzie Grey >
"Public Enemy #1 was largely a Lizzie Grey song written for London. When Nikki left the band, he gave himself 50% songwriting credit and recorded the song for the Leathur/Elektra Motley Crue release "Too Fast For Love." I was not involved with the Motley recording, but later recorded the song for the Spiders & Snakes album "London Daze." Ironically, the Spiders & Snakes version of the song is currently receiving a great deal of airplay both domestically and international.

Could you name some of your favorite bands and albums, Lizzie?
   Lizzie Grey >
Mott the Hoople (with Ian Hunter, of course); Roxy Music; Ziggy Stardust period Bowie; Sweet; New York Dolls; T Rex.

When did Ultra Pop become Spiders & Snakes? What cubs did S&S play in? Which bands did they play alongside?
   Lizzie Grey >
I recorded the two Ultra Pop records ("Ultra Pop" and "Adventures in Fantasy") more or less as a solo recording project. When the band became a live entity, the "Ultra Pop" name was too "pop" and was creating confusion with the fans of the glitter hard rock that I'm known for. Ultra Pop played dozens of shows in Hollywood. Spiders & Snakes toured the U.S and even played with the likes of W.A.S.P. Amazingly, Blackie's fans really liked the band.