Vidinė Ramybė ("Inner Peace") is a one-man power electronics/noise unit from Lithuania that has made a handful of releases since 2009. I hadn't heard anything from the project before, but already the first song "Vėl Nupulti" made a great impression on me. Crunchy harsh noise, screeching feedback and what I assume to be highly distorted vocals merge into one spastic and splendid mass of power electronics. The song has a lot of detail, and the individual sound sources have both enough room to breathe in and to function on their own, as well as the capabilities of merging together into one solid and wrathful entity. The tapes are professionally duplicated and thus allow the songs' details to shine, which pleasingly became apparent through the opening song. The second song is more minimalistic: low-pitch analogue rumbles meet muffled and constantly bursting noise-grain, with some screaming appearing in the song's end. It's a short tune that doesn't sound nearly as good as its predecessor, but it ain't bad either.

The third piece opens with droning and howling bursts of metallic noise with some feedback in the background, which makes the whole picture seem like a well thought-out composition instead of "mere noise" so to speak. After a while of this pleasing noise, the song switches to a dense layer noisy and grainy mid-pitch analogue synth drone topped with loud and fittingly tormented female screams. Akin to the second track, this part is good, but certainly not the best thing Vidinė Ramybė can create. The final song is something of an outro. A looped bit of calm and eerie ambience echoes onwards with some noise-rumbles keeping it company, and these two elements together create a pleasing and atmospheric but a somewhat basic finish to Vidinė Ramybė's side.

Vidinė Ramybė confuses me. At their best the songs are near perfection, but almost equally often they seem too restrained to unleash their full potential. If the artist can create a full EP or an album of material that's up to par with these songs' greatest, most detailed and skilled moments, I'd consider it a must buy-release. It seems I'll have to get acquainted with the project's back catalogue to find out if such a release exists already. These four pieces should be enough to quench my thirst until then.

7 / 10


If you're into harsh noise wall, chances are that you've already heard something from the solo-project Vomir with more than a hundred releases in its discography. If you haven't, here's something about the untitled recording on this tape. The main mass is provided by low-frequency rumbling that doesn't sound bassy but whooshing, akin to a vast amount of rusty metallic echo. The song is coated with constant static crackling, perhaps due to the recording equipment being unable to handle the constant flood of noise, which gives the soundscape nicely sharp and jagged coating. The mass between these two main elements consists of some analogue drone and what sound like scrap metal beats, but the wall of noise is so dense that making out different elements is a challenge - which is most probably intended. The song begins abruptly with full-on noise blasting, and ends the same way.

This is traditional quality harsh noise wall with subtle and minimal changes happening during the nineteen minutes. The tape's deep and detailed sound suits the dense and jagged fog more than well. It's a pleasing listening experience and a solid effort in massive but yet detailed harsh noise wall, but nothing mind-blowingly spectacular, original nor somehow mind-penetrative. The 19-minute excerpt is a good, steady and capable one, but that's about it. If you like noise for noise's sake and can appreciate a chaos of miniature details amidst a loud wall of noise without any actual changes in the composition, this is a good pick for you and you can add a point or two to my grading. "No progress and no change" is pretty much Vomir's concept, so you'll know what you're getting. This just wasn't enough to fully convince me.

7 / 10


The split's j-card holds quite a few collages faces and landscapes, and some close-ups of various dark and grainy textures. They didn't really offer anything to my senses nor did I find any idea behind them, but perhaps that was intentional. Either way, this split's worth giving an ear to if you appreciate noisy harshness with a detailed texture.

7 / 10